Objects of Desire

11 Feb 2021

❤ ❤ ❤

Romance never goes out of fashion, especially when we can't be together easily. You can still send a small token of your affections, like a Malcolm Appleby silver pendant or a small hand thrown Yuta Segawa pot, to show that special someone in your life how much you care.

Objects of Desire
Malcolm Appleby, Silver Pendants, 2020, silver, D1.2-1.8 cm
Objects of Desire
Yuta Segawa, Miniature Pots, 2020, glazed ceramic, H4-7 cm
Objects of Desire
Yuta Segawa, Miniature Pots, 2020, glazed ceramic, H4-7 cm

The oldest record of a valentine being sent was a poem written by a French medieval duke named Charles to his wife in 1415. Charles penned this sweet note to his lover while he was imprisoned in the Tower of London at just 21 years old. One of the lines in the poem read: I am already sick of love, My very gentle Valentine.

If you're feeling wild with passion why not push the boat out with a statement gift like a Wendy Ramshaw Ringset or glasswork by Choi Keeryong. There hand made objects of desire are made with love and will be cherished forever, but it's the thought that really counts.

Objects of Desire
Wendy Ramshaw, Ringsets, silver, gold, semi-precious stones, turned acrylic stands
Objects of Desire
Choi Keeryong, Daam Dah 3 & 4 (Red), 2020, kilnformed glass, 23.5ct gold leaf, H7-10 x W7-10 D8-10 cm
Objects of Desire
Jim Partridge & Liz Walmsley, Scorched Sculptural Vessel with Gold Leaf and Nancy Sutcliffe, Cosmic Egg III

Many Latin American countries know Valentines' Day as el día de los enamorados (day of lovers) or día del amor y la amistad (day of love and friendship). Though couples exchange gifts on this day, the holiday's focus is also directed at showing gratitude to friends.

Objects of Desire
Malcolm Appleby, Dove Brooch, silver, H3.5 x W5.2 cm
Objects of Desire
Malcolm Appleby, Selection of Silver Rings, 2020, silver, gold, sapphires

Giving red roses may be an obvious romantic gesture today, but it wasn't until the late 17th century that giving flowers became a popular custom. In fact, the practice can be traced back to when King Charles II of Sweden learned the "language of flowers" — which pairs different flowers with specific meanings — on a trip to Persia, and subsequently introduced the tradition to Europe. The act of giving flowers then became a popular trend during the Victorian Era — including on Valentine's Day — with red roses symbolizing deep love.

Objects of Desire
Lindean Mill, Selection of glassware

From beautiful hand made vases to hold the perfect bouquet of flowers, to stunning jewellery fit for a king or queen - our selection of objects by independent makers and artists will make your heart sing on Valentines' day! ❤

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